'Not only is punishment risky, but it also fails to teach the dog an acceptable alternate behaviour. The dog does not learn what to do the next time he is in the same situation. He only learns to fear the situation.' Emma Parsons, Click to Calm p73

Sunday, 7 August 2011

Betty Smith - 'The Jack Russell Terrier.'

Two: Pressing on Regardless

'[The Jack Russell Terrier] has a character all of its own, combining gaity, intelligence, lovingness, faithfulness, a keen sense of humour,a nd a wonderfully reliable temperament, with toughness, grit, gameness, quickness, a tremendous capacity for unflagging keenness and hard work, as well as good nose and eye - but I was becoming more and more impressed by their all-round suitability for almost any home or job.' (p14)

'Being small and nippy, [Jack Russells] can dodge like lightning, and have a grip like a bear-trap. They are wonderful guards, and will willingly defend their owners or their owners' belongings to the death.' (p15)


Three: Type and Temperament

'The over-aggressive terrier is just as big a risk as the obviously nervous or timid one, and I am sure that the root cause is the same - FEAR. . . . A really courageous dog is seldom aggressive, unless provoked.' (p23)


Four: Intelligence

'A stupid dog is a boring dog, although he can be amusing at times, but one's amusement is tempered with pity, as [...it...] is always rather pathetic. A really intelligent terrier, on the other hand, is a continual joy and a sheer pleasure to work with.' (p24)


Five: Starting from Scratch

'. . . a good Jack Russell bitch is worth her weight in uranium, and if the owners are willing to part with her, they are either nuts, or there is something wrong with hte bitch. And, as I have said elsewhere in this volume, a good brood bitch is all important - especially as regards temperament and working qualities. Also working bitches are funny - and if they have become really attached to their owners they may not settle well with anyone else. In fact, the better the bitch the more devoted she is, and the more accustomed to working exclusively for one person.' (p28)


Six: House-Training

'The great secrets of puppy training are watchfulness, regularity, patience, quickness and gentleness, and love and understanding.' (p33)


Eight: Mating

'Jack Russell bitches, in my experience, are incorrigible flirts, but frequently extremely choosy about their mates - often showing an unaccountable preference for the most unsuitable ones . . . or indeed anything except their chosen Jack Russell mate.' (p44)


Thirteen: Further Training

'Adolescent trainers, parted from the benign influence of well-trained, older dogs, can occasionally be troublesome and naughty.' (p64)

'Given the proverbial inch, terriers will take an ell.' (p65)


Fourteen: A Dog is a Dog is a Dog

'The great secret, I think, is never to think of a dog as merely a pet, or a useful worker, or as part of the family, but as a character in his own right, inheriting all the innate instincts and working qualities for which his breed was originally evolved, and which have gradually become fixed throughout the generations.' (p69)


Sixteen: Foxes, Badgers, Rats and Ferrets

'The great secret of making a good Jack Russell is (a) never give any conflicting or stupid orders - in other words, THINK before you speak, (b) always remain cool, quiet and firm, and (c) see that your orders are carried out. Never let a Jack Russell get the better of you.' (p75)

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